Julie Angel / Dara Dalton

This image is taken from beneith the athlete, something that is often done with male athletes, making them “stand tall” above the viewer- something very rarely done with female athletes. Females that are portrayed as strong, are often told to look angry, which is not the case here. The photo shows her facial expression, one of happiness.


Julie Angel, USA

julieangel.com

Julie is the founder of See&Do, a globally ambitious project to promote inclusivity in movement cultures: Changing perceptions of Who does what and where, one photo at a time. Artist – Filmmaker, photographer, writer, academic of the world’s first parkour themed PhD, Julie currently lives in Austin, USA, although she originally comes from Plymouth in the UK. Julie states she doesn’t have a bucketlist, instead she embraces life in each moment and claims to like the calm and controlled, not the intensity or drama – something that might be quite rare for people attracted to the action sports lifestyle.
“I like sharing stories about people who move and about movement cultures. I love See&Do: Because it’s not about the elite athletes- it’s about
contributing to a playing field where everyone can be visible and participate.”
When and why did you get in to photography?
“My friend and photographer Andy Day showed me how to use my camera properly for stills, whereas before I used it for filming. I can produce so many more photos in the same time that I would produce just one video edit. Right now photography speaks to me, and I’m listening.”

 

What made you get in to action, extreme or adventure sports?
“I like working with artists. I like moving. I train parkour, MovNat (a modern update of Methode Naturelle – running, jumping, crawling, climbing, combatives, aquatics, throwing catching, balancing) and surf whenever I can.”

 

Who is you biggest inspiration in life? Why?
“No single individual could possibly hold such a role when so many are so great.”

 

What do you think of the lack of role models for girls and women in male dominated areas?
“I think it’s lame in this day and age. Media editors have a lot to answer for. Monkey see monkey do. Monkey don’t see, monkey don’t do.”

 

How do you see women evolving in the action sports scene?
“Visibility- normalize the imagery in a visually dominant society.”

 

What are your hopes for the future of the industry?
“That it’s hyper masculinity fades!”
What is the number one preconception or prejudice people have about you?
“They think I’m nice.”

Do you have a feature or body part that you have been self-conscious about? Do you think low self-esteem in girls and stereotypes in media are
connected?
“My body is very cool, it’s mine, it works really well, no issues.”

 

Is there a difference in how women and men are portrayed in the action sports industry?
“I could write another PhD, but I’m too lazy and there’s not enough space: Too complex and big a question to answer in a small box.”
What would you say to people who want to get in to action sports, but think they might not fit in?
“Just move. Health is freedom, movement is health.”
 

Dara Dalton, USA
surfertx

Dara is 25 years old and recently graduated from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, with a Masters in Kinesiology, Exercise, and Sport Science.
Dara is a health and fitness professional who provides personalized fitness and wellness training using holistic mind and body philosophies to assist
others in reaching and maintaining their fitness goals. Health is obviously a very important aspect to Daras life and her objective is to educate and
influence the benefits of obtaining and upholding a healthy lifestyle.
“This photo was taken during the annual San Antonio Winter Jam as I was sitting on top of one of the walls at the SAWS Dam near downtown San
Antonio, Texas. I was enjoying the sun and just the general dynamics of the day. It had been over a year since seeing many of the faces, as well as
meeting many new practitioners – I was showing gratitude for being able to be in this place with these people, alive, well, and healthy.”
“My “action” story begins in 2008 when one day, after having worked at Domino’s Pizza for over a year and eating as much free pizza as I wanted, I became aware of how depressed I had become. I was not healthy in any shape or form and I had the sudden desire to make a change. This inspiration, I credit to God, because there had been no other influence to turn my life around. I dove into my resources and read/practiced as much as I could about fitness, health, and wellness. I changed my diet by making baby steps toward better foods and then incorporated regular exercise into my daily routine. I gradually developed a burning passion for health which is what led me to study kinesiology at the university. After reading Dorian Paskowitz’s “Surfing and
Health,” my view of “health” changed completely. After completing my Bachelors, I went on to earn my Masters and during these two years I discovered the importance of performance and natural movement for strength and endurance, rather than appearance. I now work as a personal trainer for the general public, a fitness and health coach for low-income families, and a parkour instructor for kids.”

 

What made you get in to action, extreme or adventure sports?
“I started participating in sports early on. My favorite sport is surfing! I taught myself how to surf when I was 12 and I have kept it up since. I discovered parkour in 2010 and began training in 2012 with a local group. I fell in love with parkour very quickly and it is as much of a passion as surfing. What I love about parkour and surfing is the freedom of expression. Surfing allows me to be just who God created me to be, in the water, away from the hustle of life on land. When I surf, it is just me, God, and the waves. I love it. Parkour allows me to be creative through movement which is not common for most sports. I believe I was inspired by God in both parkour and surfing simply because my interest in these activities were sudden, overwhelming, and not influenced by any person around me.”

 

What do you think of the lack of role models for girls and women in male dominated areas?
“Men are stronger physically and tend to be more bold than women when it comes to extreme actions – take surfing for example, only a handful of women have surfed big waves compared to the amount of men who have tackled these giants. I think it’s because women might be more cautious and hesitant in perilous situations. There is nothing wrong with this, balance in the human race is necessary. This is not to state women are not bold, because I know MANY women who are very bold and dominate. I believe society just needs to show young girls that it is OK not being solely
enveloped in “girly” things. The term “run like a girl” needs to be exterminated.”

 

How do you see women evolving in the action sports scene?
“Motivation. It is simple – internally fuel motivation for activity, and action will follow suit. It starts in childhood and translates into lifetime behavior. Young girls need to see strong and confident women in sports, women who are not exploited in a sexual manner, and women who show feminism in their lifestyle. A woman does not have to give up looking and acting their natural female way, just because she is also OK with getting sweaty, and getting dirt under her freshly manicured nails.”

 

What are your hopes for the future of the industry?
“My hopes for the future of women in action sports are Top notch women who live by a set of noble morals and show others that being bold and confident just the way God designed them to be, that it is more than OK – that it is necessary.”

 

Do you have a feature or body part that you have been self-conscious about? Do you think low self-esteem in girls and stereotypes in media are
connected?
“Most definitely… don’t we all? I have been, and still on some days are, haunted by my gut (belly, tummy, pot-belly- whichever). I have always had a little extra fat on my lower stomach that has forever prevented me from having completely flat and toned abdominal. I have always hated this about myself. Recently, though, I’ve realized that my abilities, who I am and what I can do should be more focused on my performance rather than how I look. I can now do a pull-up, when two years ago I could not. This is what matters – how I can move over how I look. I believe the media unrealistically portrays women and state how we are “suppose to” look. I probably never would have gained the desire to have a flat stomach if I had never seen one on TV or in a magazine and the fact that it is genetically difficult for me to obtain what the media portrays, So yes, low-self esteem is connected to this.”

 

Is there a difference in how women and men are portrayed in the action sports industry?
“Men are portrayed as strong, dashing, eligible bachelors, and in most cases, unrealistic (but the media has a way with design). Women are almost always portrayed as a pretty thing to look at, as if her looks are the only reason why anyone has an interest in her. This effect is negative and gives young girls a misconception about women in sports. It draws them to believe that in order to be noticed, all you have to do is be pretty just the way the media wants you to be – and this is not true at all.”

 

What would you say to people who want to get in to action sports, but think they might not fit in?
“I tell them to go for it no matter the circumstances. If the passion is there, then it is there for a reason. I would add, “have faith in yourself and God” because “if the Lord calls you to do it, He will see you through it.”